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Sweet pea was designed around our friend Gina’s desires to live comfortably and spaciously, and to someday get hitched and start a family. The french doors open at the side, which stretches the space and avoids splitting it down the middle. The skylights, windows and bump-out nook invite the outdoors inside, adding to the feeling of spaciousness. The sleeping loft was built with as much space as possible to accommodate two adults, and the window seat (with storage underneath) is a great sleeping option for kids. We also specifically opened up the bathroom and included a tub/shower combination, unlike the more standard shower-only models, to accommodate bathing a small child. Sweet pea is 136 square feet of living space, not including the sleeping loft. It sits on a trailer that is 16 feet long.

While the house was designed with Gina in mind, it is an inviting design for anyone who wants a particularly spacious tiny home, or feels their family might be on its way to growing.

In the United States the average size of new single family homes grew from 1,780 square feet (165 m2) in 1978 to 2,479 square feet (230.3 m2) in 2007, and to 2,662 square feet (247.3 m2) in 2013, despite a decrease in the size of the average family. Reasons for this include increased material wealth and prestige. In most areas, it's against zoning regulations to live in a tiny house on its own land, either because camping on one's own land isn't permitted or because one can't have a tiny house without also having an approved primary (larger) dwelling on the property. Most readily available spots for living in a tiny home are in the backyard of larger home, in an RV park, or in an existing community or eco-village.

The small house movement is a return to houses of less than 1,000 square feet (93 m2). Frequently the distinction is made between small (between 400 square feet (37 m2) and 1,000 square feet (93 m2)), and tiny houses (less than 400 square feet (37 m2)), with some as small as 80 square feet (7.4 m2).Sarah Susanka has been credited with starting the recent countermovement toward smaller houses when she published The Not So Big House (1997). Earlier pioneers include Lloyd Kahn, author of Shelter (1973) and Lester Walker, author of ″Tiny Houses″ (1987). Henry David Thoreau, and the publication of his book "Walden" is also quoted as early inspiration.

Tiny houses on wheels were popularized by Jay Shafer who designed and lived in a 96 sq ft house and later went on to offer the first plans for tiny houses on wheels, initially founding Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, and then Four Lights Tiny House Company (September 6, 2012). In 2002, he co-founded, along with Greg Johnson, Shay Salomon and Nigel Valdez the Small House Society. Salomon and Valdez subsequently published their guide to the modern Small House Movement, ″Little House on a Small Planet″ (2006) and Johnson published his memoir, "Put Your Life on a Diet" (2008)

In 2005, after Hurricane Katrina, Marianne Cusato developed Katrina Cottages, that start at 308 square feet (28.6 m2) as an alternative to FEMA trailers. Though these were created to provide a pleasant solution to a disaster zone, Cusato received wider interest in her design from developers of resorts, for example.


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