Too Cute Tiny House and Plans


I thought this design would be great for those of you who love the idea of tiny house living because of the freedom is offers but need just a bit more space than what a tiny house on wheels is able to offer.

This way you can still reap the benefits of simple living, like lowering your living costs, freeing up your time and in general giving you a bit more control over your life.

But you don’t have to give up that much space. What do you think? Would you rather have a slightly larger tiny house around 300-500 square feet. Maybe even a little bit bigger. Or would you rather go with tiny as in 100-200 square feet or so?

Plywood used for the subfloor, etc. come in 8×4 sheets, so design your house so full sheets can be used with no waste. In other words don’t build a 300 ft. house build a 320 ft. house. That size uses 10 sheets of plywood with no waste.

Don't worry, if building isn't your thing consider buying a used tiny house. Like an RV, tiny houses on wheels depreciate. Sometimes you can get a great bargain from someone who tried tiny living and decided it wasn't right or ran into trouble with zoning. You can find used tiny houses on Craigslist, eBay and Tiny House Listings. (Note: if you find a house you like on Tiny House Listings, it's best to search the web for another source for responding. From my own experience and that reported by others, the contact form on this site may never reach the recipient. Try searching Craigslist or use Google image search instead.) Be sure to inspect the house before buying (some are very poorly built) and find out the status of the title and registration before you commit. Prices often drop from the first listing, so unless you really love the house, you might do well to wait a couple of weeks and watch it.

Cost varies greatly from a low of zero (if you can get all your materials donated or find free salvage and build it yourself) to a high of $80,000 or more with a luxury builder, but in general, the average tiny house on wheels will cost $20,000 to $25,000 in materials and an additional $10,000 to $20,000 in labor. Be sure to create a budget.

The financial crisis of 2007–08, fueled the growth of the small house movement. For thousands who lost their homes due to foreclosure or unemployment, tiny houses became an attractive option. With their low cost and relative ease of construction, tiny houses are being adopted as shelter for the homeless in Eugene, OR, Olympia, WA, Ithaca, NY and other cities. Communities of tiny houses can offer residents a transition towards self-sufficiency.

One of the biggest obstacles to growth of the tiny house movement is the difficulty in finding a place to live in one. Zoning regulations typically specify minimum square footage for new construction on a foundation, and for tiny houses on wheels, parking on one's own land may be prohibited by local regulations against "camping." In addition, RV parks do not always welcome tiny houses. DIYers may be turned away, as many RV parks require RVs be manufactured by a member of the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association "(RVIA)".

Tiny houses on wheels are considered RVs and not suitable for permanent residence, according to the RVIA. From RVBusiness, "The RVIA will continue to shy away from allowing members who produce products that are referred to as 'tiny houses' or 'tiny homes. (However, the RVIA does allow “tiny home” builders to join as long as their units are built to park model RV standards.)"


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