Very Pretty Hand Crafted 1br/1ba plus Loft Tiny Home


39′ tiny house for sale to be moved to your land! This house was completely handcrafted and customized, about one year ago. It has a sleeping loft, as well as a bedroom, full bathroom with tub, kitchen with dishwasher, full-sized side-by-side refrigerator, washer/dryer combo, and huge convection/microwave oven. Hardwood floors throughout, tongue-and-groove on the walls and ceiling. House comes furnished with couch, king-sized mattress in loft, and front deck with stairs. Trailer has dual tandem 10k axles with electric brakes. It was custom made with 2 12″ I-beams and 4″ channel steel cross-members on 16″ centers.

It's important to consider security during your build and even after you're living in it. You can make it difficult for a thief to tow away your tiny house by installing a hitch lock (Megahitch Lock Coupler Vault or TriMax Universal Unattended Coupler) or by using a wheel lock. GPS devices can help you track your house if it does get stolen. However, most require frequent charging of a battery and so will be useful only if you go to the build site frequently. Here's a helpful article with additional tips on securing your tiny house.

Your tiny house design should take into consideration how much weight is forward (toward the tongue of the trailer) and how much is on the back of the trailer (which might be the front of the house). Generally, tiny houses on wheels should be no more than 13'6" high and 8'6" wide, in order to tow them without special permits or licenses. However, some states are more restrictive; some are less. Here's a handy but unofficial summary of size limitations. Please check with your local DMV for the laws in your state.

The tongue weight is the static force the trailer tongue exerts on the hitch ball. An improper load condition can make for a dangerous trailering situation. If you don't have enough weight on the trailer tongue (less than 10 percent of the total loaded trailer weight) the trailer can end up swaying from side to side, making it difficult to control. If you have too much weight on the trailer tongue (more than 15 percent of the total loaded trailer weight) it can overload the rear tires and push the rear of the vehicle around. You might not be able to go around corners and curves properly, and your vehicle might not stop fast enough when you press the brake pedal.

According to the 2013 GMC Trailering Guide, to get the proper trailer tongue weight, you should put about 60 percent of the load centered evenly over the front half of the trailer. You can calculate the proper trailer tongue weight by figuring 10 to 15% of the total loaded trailer weight. For example, a 3,000 pound trailer has a proper tongue weight of 300 to 450 pounds.

One of the biggest obstacles to growth of the tiny house movement is the difficulty in finding a place to live in one. Zoning regulations typically specify minimum square footage for new construction on a foundation, and for tiny houses on wheels, parking on one's own land may be prohibited by local regulations against "camping." In addition, RV parks do not always welcome tiny houses. DIYers may be turned away, as many RV parks require RVs be manufactured by a member of the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association "(RVIA)".

Tiny houses on wheels are considered RVs and not suitable for permanent residence, according to the RVIA. From RVBusiness, "The RVIA will continue to shy away from allowing members who produce products that are referred to as 'tiny houses' or 'tiny homes. (However, the RVIA does allow “tiny home” builders to join as long as their units are built to park model RV standards.)"

In 2014, the first "tiny house friendly town" was declared in Spur, Texas, however it was later clarified that a tiny house may not be on wheels but must be secured to a foundation.


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